Oriel Plas Glyn y Weddw

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Oriel Plas Glyn y Weddw, Llanbedrog

Although this grand Gothic building may look like a house, it was built for the art collection of Elizabeth, widow of Sir Love Jones-Parry. This family was the main landowner on the Llŷn Peninsula.

Oriel Plas Glyn-y-Weddw is Wales’ oldest art gallery, built in 1857. In 1896, Cardiff entrepreneur Solomon Andrews bought the building and developed it as a public gallery. He added a tea room and dance hall and developed the gardens. To improve accessibility, he constructed a tramway from the west end of Pwllheli to the gallery.

The gallery’s collection includes Swansea and Nantgarw porcelain, from the early 19th century, on long-term loan from the Andrews family. The gallery holds exhibitions of work by artists from Wales and further afield, as well as concerts and other events.

Also on loan to the gallery are two Latin-inscribed stones discovered c.6km away in the 1830s. They commemorate two Welsh saints who lived in the 5th or 6th century. They were left in situ until the 1890s, when they were sent to the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. They returned to Llŷn a century later, following a local repatriation campaign.

“Oriel” is Welsh for gallery. “Glyn” = valley or glen. “Gweddw” = widow.
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Where is this HiPoint?

Postcode: LL53 7TT

Website of Oriel Plas Glyn y Weddw – including detailed historical information

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