Britain's smallest house

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The smallest house in Great Britain, Lower Gate Street, Conwy

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Don’t be fooled by the appearance of this quaint red building. It wasn’t built as a tourist attraction, nor was it ever an extension to a larger house.

Here’s how it came into being. Houses were built in rows against the medieval town wall. One row was built from the north end of the street southwards, the other from the south end northwards. The two rows didn’t meet, and the gap between them was eventually exploited to create a new home at minimal expense.

The southern row of houses has long since vanished, leaving Britain’s Smallest House as the end building of the northern row. The printing works for the North Wales Weekly News has also come and gone in this area. The site is now an open space for street performers or marquees during special events.

The Smallest House was a residence until 15 May 1900. It was saved when Roger Dawson, editor of the North Wales Weekly News, spotted its potential. He placed a notice in The Times asking people to contact him if they knew of a smaller house anywhere in Britain. Other contenders were measured but none was found to be smaller than this house in Conwy, which has featured in the Guinness Book of World Records for many years.

If you find it hard to believe that anyone could live in such a cramped house, take a look inside at the remarkable living arrangements. You’ll be amazed when you learn who used to live here!

Where is this HiPoint?

Postcode: LL32 8BE

Website of the Smallest House in Great Britain

Thanks to RNIB for the audio presentation of this page

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