Bangor Railway Institute war memorial

Bangor Railway Institute war memorial

The war memorial at Bangor railway station was originally at St David’s Church, Glanadda. It commemorates members of the institute’s Boys’ Corps who died in the First World War. See below for their details.

The Railway Institute was a centre for rail workers to socialise, exercise and read. Its building on Euston Road, Bangor, was opened by in 1898 by Lord Stalbridge, chairman of the London & North Western Railway. The building re-used materials from the original station buildings at Llandudno Junction. It included a reading room, gymnasium, baths and a refreshment room. The LNWR donated hundreds of books for the institute’s library.

The institute’s Boys’ Corps provided basic military training for sons or nephews of railway workers. Many of them joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers’ 6th Battalion soon after the outbreak of war and departed from Bangor railway station in November 1914 for further training before deployment.

The institute building was demolished in 2016.

The war memorial was created in March 1919 and displayed at St David’s Church, known as the ‘Railway church’. The church closed for services in 2014. Network Rail placed the memorial on display at Bangor station in 2019, after a request from former churchwarden Sheila Owen, historian Bridget Geoghegan and the North Wales Railway Circle.

With thanks to Bridget Geoghegan

Postcode: LL57 1LZ

 

Boys’ Corps men who died in the First World War

Where shown, click this icon for our page in memory of the person: Extra page icon

  • Caesar Alfred Cooil. Son of Caesar and Elizabeth Cooil of 2 Orme View, Euston Road. Educated Friars School, Bangor, and University College of North Wales (Bangor). Played football for the North Wales Coast League. Was assistant master at King Edward’s School, Nottingham. Served as a Captain, Midland Royal Garrison Artillery. While home on leave was sent to the military Hospital in Glanadda, Bangor. Gas poisoning had caused pneumonia. Died on the last day of the war, 11 November 1918 aged 27. Buried Glanadda Cemetery, Bangor. Brother of John, below.
  • John Dentith Cooil. Son of Caesar and Elizabeth Cooil of 2 Orme View, Euston Road. Educated Friars School. Worked as an ‘Office Youth’ with the LNWR. Served as Private 25453, South Wales Borderers. Reported missing, thought to be a prisoner of war, in November 1917. Body found in 1920, identified by initials ‘JDC’ on cigarette case. Died 10 November 1917 aged 20. Buried Tyne Cot Cemetery, Belgium.
  • William Cox. Son of John Cox of 30 Albert Street. Was a mason’s labourer on the LNWR. Served as Lance Corporal 1066, 1st/6th (Carnarvonshire & Anglesey) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Wounded in action at Gallipoli. Died at sea 21 August 1915 aged 25. Buried at sea. Commemorated Helles Memorial, Turkey.
  • Alexander Scott Hill. Son of Alexander Scott Hill and Margaret of Brynmair on Caellepa. Educated Bethesda County School. Was a clerk at the National Provincial Bank in Bangor. Served as Private 37673 King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). Died 18 April 1918 aged 19. Commemorated Loos Memorial, France.
  • Edgar Holland. Son of Richard and Mary Jane Holland of 23 Belmont Street. Served as Private 35788, 8th Battalion Border Regiment. Killed in action 29 April 1918 aged 19. Commemorated Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.  His father and brother also served in the war.
  • John Idwal Hughes. Son of Robert and Jane Hughes of Deanfield, previously 40 Penchwintan Road. Had been a telegraph messenger then assistant postman with the General Post Office. Served as Sapper 126633, Royal Engineers. Died of dysentery on 26 November 1917 aged 20. Buried Dar Es Salaam War Cemetery, Tanzania.soldier icon
  • William Samuel Hughes. Son of Hugh Owen and Jane Hughes of 5 Orme Terrace, Euston Road. Was a painter on the LNWR. Served as Private 1597, 1st/6th Battalion (Carnarvonshire & Anglesey) Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Brought home from Egypt because of dysentery. Died in West Didsbury Military Hospital, Manchester, on 17 July 1916 aged 29; buried Glanadda Cemetery, Bangor.  Commemorated by a ‘Special Memorial’ after the loss of his grave.
  • Benjamin Roberts. Son of Laura and the late John Roberts of Bangorfa, Treharris, Glamorgan, previously of 13 Hendrewen Road, Bangor. Was a collier. Served as Serjeant 11451, 6th Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment. Died 23 April 1917 aged 29. Buried Faubourt d’Amiens Cemetery, France.
  • Robert Roberts. Son of Mr and Mrs John Roberts of 9 Victoria Square, Glanadda. Was a labourer on the LNWR. Served as Lance Corporal 1081, 1st/6th (Carnarvonshire & Anglesey) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action at  Gallipoli on 11 August 1915. Commemorated Helles Memorial, Turkey.
  • John Samuel Roberts. Son of John and Mary Roberts of Kimberley Road, Llandudno Junction, previously of 9 Tan y Graig, Bangor. Was a shop assistant before enlisting. Served as Private 37761 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died Friday 17 August 1917 aged 20. Buried Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium
  • Robert Roberts. Son of Robert and Sarah Roberts of 8 St Paul’s Terrace. Possibly worked as an LNWR porter. Served as Boy 2nd Class 92385, Royal Navy, HMS Impregnable. Died in Plymouth of pneumonia on 10 November 1918 aged 16. Buried Glanadda Cemetery.
  • Richard Thomas. Son of the late Robert and Catherine Thomas of 326 Carnarvon Road. Was possibly a ‘deck boy’ on the LNWR. Served as Private 28728, Royal Welsh Fusiliers 19th Battalion. Killed while working as a stretcher bearer in the Battle of Boulen Woods 24 November 1917 aged 19. Commemorated Cambrai Memorial, France.
  • Maurice Ward. Son of John and Jane Ward of 413 Carnarvon Road. Was an LNWR joiner. Served as Lance Corporal 1075, 1st/6th (Carnarvonshire & Anglesey) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Died of diabetes at military hospital in Cambridge on Saturday 20 February 1915 aged 24. Buried Glanadda Cemetery, Bangor.
  • Robert Williams. Son of Robert and Mary Ryna Williams of 254 Carnarvon Road. Was possibly a ‘page’ on the LNWR. Served as Private 28566, 19th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action Wednesday 18 October 1916 aged 21. Buried Philosophe British Cemetery, France.
  • David Richard Williams.Was an orphan brought up by his cousin, Mrs Owen of 260 Carnarvon Road. Was a general labourer on the LNWR. Served as Private 2682, 1st/6th (Carnarvonshire & Anglesey) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Wounded after landing at Gallipoli. Died on board hospital ship HMHS Salta on the way to Egypt. Buried at sea on 15 August 1915 aged 21. Commemorated Helles Memorial, Turkey.
  • James Wyllie MM. Son of Mr and Mrs James Wyllie of 27 Caellepa. Was a member of for Bangor Athletic Club. Served as Private 5317, 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Killed in action when a German bomb exploded on his section of trench, causing what became known as ‘Red Dragon Crater’, on 22 June 1916 aged 19. Bodies there were discovered in 1924 and identified by possessions. James was reburied at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, France. Awarded Mons Star Medal, and the Military Medal for rescuing a wounded officer from near the German trenches.  James’ brother David received the DSM for his bravery as a Royal Navy telegraphist in the Battle of Jutland.