Foel Lus viewpoint

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Foel Lus viewpoint

From this junction of footpaths on the eastern side of Foel Lus we can look straight along Sychnant Pass, where a turnpike road was constructed in 1772. Beyond, if visibility is good, we can see the houses of Deganwy, on the far side of the Conwy estuary. Beyond that, on the opposite side of the Creuddyn peninsula, is Rhos-on-Sea – which can be seen more clearly by climbing towards the summit of Foel Lus.

From here the Wales Coast Path runs roughly level around the north side of Foel Lus on the Jubilee Path, opened in 1888 and named after Queen Victoria’s Jubilee (marking 50 years of her reign) a year earlier. This provides a good view over the water to Anglesey and Ynys Seiriol (or Puffin Island), named after the 6th century saint who established a hermitage there.

Use the image below to identify features visible to the east from Foel Lus. Foel means hill, Llus means bilberry.
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“Sych” is Welsh for dry, “nant” means stream. Water rarely flows in the cleft below the road.
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Capel Ulo means Chapel of Ulo. It is said that St Ulo had a chapel there in the early medieval period.
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Allt means slope or hill, wen means white.
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Maen Esgob means “bishop’s stone”, and is said to relate to a Bishop of Bangor who once owned this land.
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view from foel lus looking east

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