Plas Coch

button_lang_frenchPlas Coch, High Street, Llanberis

This substantial town house, now a guest house, was built for a manager of one of the local slate quarries c.1865, the date inscribed in one of the lintels. It was originally set in spacious grounds, with an orchard to the south of the house. Buildings were later constructed over much of the grounds.

In 1902, more than 700 Oddfellows celebrated their lodge’s 25th anniversary with a dinner in a tent erected in a field belonging to John Williams of Plas Coch. The Oddfellows order was a friendly society, long before the welfare state. It paid money to members in times of need, such as old age.

John and his wife Ellen had 10 children, one of whom died in infancy. Their daughter Jennie was a nurse in France for three years in the First World War. She died of pneumonia in January 1919 and was buried with military ceremony in Le Havre. Click here for our page in her memory.

One of John and Ellen’s sons was captain of a merchant ship but died of illness in Africa. Another son died in Wisconsin, USA. Their son Robert was appointed organist at St David’s Church, Liverpool, in 1899. Another son, Orwig, was organist at Moriah Chapel, Caernarfon, and in 1910 started teaching “elements of music” at Dolbadarn Council School, Llanberis. John died, aged 74, in January 1907. Ellen died seven months later.

William Williams of Plas Coch led a boys’ choir in a competitive singing event at Capel Coch, Llanberis in 1881.

Morris Williams of Plas Coch was a talented pianist, and was in demand as an accompanist for concerts and competitions. In 1889, he accompanied various performers in a benefit concert for Owen Williams of Nant Peris, who had lost a limb in a quarry accident in Nantlle. The concert raised more than £14.

Postcode: LL55 4HB    View Location Map

Website of Plas Coch guest house